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Natural burial ground proposed for Goolwa
Natural burial ground proposed for Goolwa

20 June 2024, 8:30 PM

Alexandrina residents are being asked for their feedback on a unique proposal to establish Australia’s first 'restoration' natural burial ground.The site would be in a portion of unused land at the Old Goolwa Cemetery.The proposal was put forward by the not-for-profit Natural Burial Ground Trust of Australia,  in partnership with the Nature Foundation.It was considered by Alexandrina Council at its meeting on Monday June 17 with councillors voting to put the concept out for community consultation.Alexandrina Mayor Keith Parkes says the exciting opportunity has no cost to ratepayers.“Besides the fact this is a lower-cost option for burial, we know there are many people in our community who are passionate about the retention of bush sites and the natural environment and this is an opportunity to have a chemical-free, more sustainable burial that connects the death of an individual to the restoration of the planet.“The difference with the proposed 'restoration' natural burial ground is that it is established on land that has been cleared or needs environmental restoration, and the fees charged for a natural burial are used to fund landscaping, restoration programs and other positive environmental outcomes at the site and other environmentally significant locations.“There is already an existing Bush Forever site at the Old Goolwa Cemetery.“This proposal will not disturb any of the existing historical burials on the site and there will be a vegetated buffer zone between the restoration burial ground and the historical burial ground to ensure no disturbance.“This is a unique idea and Council Members are keen for the Natural Burial Ground Trust of Australia and the Nature Foundation to look at other sites in our region.”The Burial and Cremation Act 2013 and associated regulations allow for this type of offering.The Act, championed by the late Hon Dr Bob Such, enshrines natural burial grounds as environmental burial places distinct from traditional cemeteries.The council looked at two possible sites – a vacant land parcel at Ashbourne set aside for cemetery purposes and the unused portion of land at the Old Goolwa Cemetery site.The Old Goolwa Cemetery site was selected because there is already an existing Bush Forever site in the area.As well as endorsing the Old Goolwa Cemetery proposal for community consultation, the council also voted to invite the Natural Burial Ground Trust of Australia and the Nature Foundation to scope the vacant land at Ashbourne for the establishment of a restoration natural burial ground.The Natural Burial Ground Trust of Australia and the Nature Foundation are not-for-profit organisations and registered environmental charities.The intent is to enable individuals and families to choose an affordable, natural burial that connects the death of an individual to the restoration of the planet.Costs associated with a 'restoration' natural burial are kept to a minimum to cover the operating expenses associated with the individual burial only, and surplus revenue is used for the protection and expansion of the native habitat.The Nature Foundation manages more than half a million hectares of conservation land in SA, including a high-value wetland in the Alexandrina Council area.Kevin Hartley from the Natural Burial Ground Trust of Australia says every burial in the proposed restoration burial ground at Goolwa would include a two times carbon-positive offset and provide funding to the Nature Foundation to support biodiversity and restoration initiatives.“A restoration natural burial ground gives people the opportunity to choose an authentic natural burial style that connects the death of an individual to the restoration of the planet,” he says.“It's a genuine return to the earth and a way for people to leave a living legacy for their families.”Nature Foundation’s Deputy CEO Mark Ashley says the collaboration with the Natural Burial Ground Trust is a really innovative way to support its work. “People are choosing sustainable options in everyday life and being able to give back at the end of life is meaningful.”Consultation on the proposal is now open and will close at 5 pm on Friday 12 July.Full details are available on Council’s My Say Alexandrina website, with hard copies available at Council offices at Goolwa and Strathalbyn.Kangaroos at the Old Goolwa Cemetery. 

All the fun of the Science Fair
All the fun of the Science Fair

20 June 2024, 2:36 AM

The Victor Harbor Recreation Centre will host a Science Fair for all ages on Sunday 30 June.Presented by The Science Collective, the fair promises a day of engaging activities, fascinating exhibits, and thrilling science shows. Highlights will include educational performances by SciFiBri and Animals Anonymous. The inflatable planetarium will also be there, offering an immersive experience of the wonders of the universe.With a mission to inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers, and innovators, The Science Collective is dedicated to promoting science education and engagement through interactive events and exhibits.The Collective’s Brian Haddy says the event is set to inspire and entertain visitors of all ages. "We're excited to offer interactive exhibits from the Marine Discovery Centre, Fleurieu Marine Education, and Roboroos. "Participants will have the opportunity to engage with numerous hands-on activities designed to spark curiosity and a love for science." City of Victor Harbor Mayor Dr Moira Jenkins says the council is proud to support the Science Fair as part of the 2024 Winter Whale Fest. "The Victor Harbor Science Fair is an exciting event for families, educators, and anyone with a passion for science and discovery. "It’s a great chance for kids to learn something new... except they’ll be having so much fun, they won’t realise they’re learning!” The fair will offer two sessions, from10am to 1pm and from 2pm to 5pm.Tickets are available online and cost $10, or $32 for a family. More information about the Winter Whale Fest, including the full event program, is available on the website.  

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Ban on engineered stone from 1 July
Ban on engineered stone from 1 July

19 June 2024, 8:46 PM

South Australia will implement a ban on engineered stone products from 1 July 2024, joining other states and territories to protect workers from the risk of fatal lung disease. The ban prohibits the manufacture, supply, processing and installation of engineered stone benchtops, panels and slabs.A statewide campaign, led by SafeWork SA will raise awareness of the ban and what it means to businesses, workers, consumers and the public. The campaign will include press and radio advertising, factsheets, educational webinars and social media. When engineered stone is processed, such as by cutting or grinding, it releases small particles of respirable crystalline silica dust that, when inhaled into the lungs, can cause silicosis – a disease resulting in permanent disability or death, and with no known cure except lung transplantation. The ban on engineered stone was a unanimous decision of Commonwealth, State and Territory Work Health and Safety Ministers and was based on a recommendation by Safe Work Australia following expert advice about the rise of silicosis in engineered stone workers. In addition to banning the use of engineered stone benchtops, panels and slabs, amendments to work health and safety regulations will:Permit minor modifications, repair and removal of engineered stone benchtops, panels and slabs installed prior to 1 July 2024.Require South Australian businesses to notify SafeWork SA in advance of any permitted minor works – failure to do so will constitute an offence.Create a process for persons to apply to have a type of engineered stone exempted from the ban where there is compelling evidence it can be worked with safely.Alternatives to engineered stone benchtops include porcelain, stainless steel, sintered stone, polished concrete, recycled glass and natural stone such as marble and granite. Further amendments to work health and safety laws will start on 1 September 2024 to create a stronger regulatory framework for crystalline silica processes in other industries, including additional risk assessments, training and air monitoring. Engineered stone is safe once installed, as long as it remains undisturbed, and householders are not required to remove engineered stone installed prior to 1 July. More information is available via the SafeWork SA website. Minister for Industrial Relations Kyam Maher says Silicosis is a rapidly growing problem across Australia.  “The ban on the use of engineered stone will protect South Australia’s stone workers and tradies from the fatal effects of respirable silica dust.  “We are undertaking an extensive community awareness campaign about the ban so there is no excuse for businesses that don’t comply with the new regulations.” SafeWork SA Executive Director Glenn Farrell says SafeWork SA will actively monitor compliance with the new laws through auditing and inspections. “SafeWork SA will not hesitate to act against any business that breaches the new regulations.” SA Unions Secretary Dale Beasley says the ban is not just a regulatory measure.“It is a promise to future generations that their health and safety will always be our top priority. “This victory is also a moment to acknowledge and remember the workers who have suffered from silicosis. “The stories of stonemasons who battled this debilitating disease have driven home the urgent need for this ban. “Their courage and the tireless advocacy of their workmates have been pivotal in achieving this outcome. “An instagram-worthy kitchen isn't worth your life. Like asbestos before it, engineered stone has managed to make its way into millions of homes, if handled incorrectly, workers and home renovators could be exposed to this deadly dust.”

RSPCA funds boost for animal welfare
RSPCA funds boost for animal welfare

19 June 2024, 2:30 AM

The RSPCA SA has been a big winner from the recent state budget, with a 350 per cent increase in funding over the next four years.Most of the money will go toward helping the organisation enforce South Australia’s proposed new animal welfare laws. The 2024-25 State Budget provides an extra $16.4 million over four years to RSPCA SA to deliver animal welfare compliance activities in accordance with the soon to be updated Animal Welfare Act 1985. Currently, RSPCA SA inspectors investigate more than 4000 animal cruelty reports each year. The funding comes from a state government commitment to undertake sweeping reforms to outdated animal welfare laws. These major reforms to the both the Animal Welfare Act and the Dog and Cat Management Act will include sharp increases in penalties for those who neglect and abuse animals. It follows the recent opening of RSPCA SA’s new $28 million Animal Care Centre which is ushering in a new era for animal welfare in South Australia. The centre, on the corner of Main South and Majors roads, O’Halloran Hill, has all staff, volunteers and animals located on the one purpose-built site for the first time.Deputy Premier Susan Close says the RSPCA SA will finally be properly funded to undertake the important work they do in keeping animals safe from abuse. “This large increase in funding recognises that community expectations around animal welfare have significantly increased and the important role the RSPCA SA plays in ensuring those who chose to abuse animals are both deterred and held to account.” 

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Cost of living concession payments arrive
Cost of living concession payments arrive

17 June 2024, 9:00 PM

The state government’s once-off additional Cost of Living Concession payment of $243.90 lands in the bank accounts of more than 210,000 South Australian households this week.Payments have begun rolling out to households that received last year’s Cost of Living Concession, with all payments to be made by the end of the week.The payment aims to provide immediate and targeted support to South Australians on low or fixed incomes at the onset of winter when energy bills increase for many households.Everyone who received the 2023-24 Cost of Living Concession, whether a homeowner, tenant or Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holder – will receive the same amount of $243.90.It will be paid automatically into bank accounts by electronic funds transfer and can be identified by the payment description ‘Concessions COLC’.People whose bank details have changed, or who have become eligible in the past year should update them by completing the online household concessions form or contacting the Concessions Hotline 1800 307 758.This once-off additional Cost of Living Concession payment is part of the $266.2 million cost of living relief package announced in the 2024-25 State Budget.This package also included $36.6 million over four years to permanently double the Cost of Living Concession for tenants and Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders so they get paid the same as homeowners from 2024-25.This means that from 1 July 2024, all eligible recipients will get the new standard amount of $255.60, with this payment to be made from August.  Ross Womersley, CEO of South Australian Council of Social Service, has welcomed the concessions initiatives.  “In 2021 our major State of Concessions report found the state’s concessions system was fundamentally broken – above all else, it was unfair and wasn’t helping as many people in need that it should have been. “The Labor Party committed to reviewing the concessions system in the leadup to the 2022 election, and this review was conducted in 2023. “As part of the review we hosted a community panel made up of everyday South Australians – some of whom receive concessions, and some who don’t – and we are very pleased that the government has listened to the findings of the panel and many other stakeholders, and made the concessions system fairer and more equitable for those South Australians who need this assistance the most. “These measures are a significant and welcome package of reforms that will provide real and timely assistance to South Australians in financial stress.” Miranda Starke, Chief Executive of Council on the Ageing SA also welcomes the extra Cost-of-Living Concession payment. “We were glad to hear that renters and Commonwealth Senior Health Card holders will have their concession amount doubled to match that of homeowners. “COTA SA were pleased to be a part of the State Government’s concession review and to bring the voices of older South Australians to the table.  “More older people than ever before are retiring with a mortgage, and a growing number are renting. “They are having to make hard decisions about whether they heat or cool their home, put food on their table or fuel in their car. “This relief measure is particularly important for the growing population of older renters, who are amongst the most financially disadvantaged, as they juggle the increasing cost of living, often on low and fixed incomes.”For more information and eligibility, go to the website. 

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Alexandrina CEO resigns
Alexandrina CEO resigns

16 June 2024, 8:30 PM

Alexandrina Council has announced the resignation of its Chief Executive Officer Nigel Morris, after only two years in the job.Mr Morris joined Alexandrina Council as Chief Executive in May 2022 after serving as CEO of the District Council of Yankalilla for more than six years.He will take up a senior leadership position at Boroondara Council, in Melbourne, as the Director of Customer and Transformation, leaving Alexandrina at the end of July.Mayor Keith Parkes has thanked Mr Morris for his service to the council and his commitment to the Alexandrina community.“Nigel came to us with extensive experience in local government and the issues important to the Fleurieu region and Alexandrina Council has benefitted significantly from that knowledgeand his inclusive leadership,” says Mayor Parkes.“Nigel has strong sense of community and over the past two years he has been an accessible and involved Chief Executive Officer who has fostered greater engagement and collaboration between Council and our community.“He has steered us through three budgets during challenging times as we grapple with the impacts of high inflation in a post-COVID economy, and he has done so a way that has include more face-to-face public consultation than this Council has conducted in the past.“To deliver more than $5 million in operational savings in the past 18 months is an outstanding effort. “He has also stepped in to oversee several ongoing major projects, including the Goolwa Wharf Precinct upgrade, and has reined in expenditure in a high-cost market to achieve the best outcomes for our community.“Nigel has also brought about a positive change in the organisational culture of Council and I have great confidence in the professional and dedicated executive team he has built upduring his time with us.“Council is in good hands as we move forward with the recruitment process for a new CEO. In the meantime, our CEO Performance Management Panel will start the process ofrecommending an interim CEO to Council Members.”Mr Morris says his proudest achievement in his two years at Alexandrina Council is building a strong General Management team. “I feel comfortable leaving Alexandrina Council as I know with the team in place the organisation will continue to grow from strength to strength.“We are on track to deliver not only the current year’s $22 million capital program but also catch up on over $20 million from previous years’ projects, including the decade long-discussed Goolwa Wharf Revitalisation, which is now set to be delivered in October 2024.”

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Footprints – Ravine Hike Ravine des Casoars, Kangaroo Island
Footprints – Ravine Hike Ravine des Casoars, Kangaroo Island

15 June 2024, 8:30 PM

SPOTLIGHT STORYWords & Photos: Susie WilliamsThis Kangaroo Island hike starts from the Ravine des Casoars Road, just 7 km south of the Playford Highway near Cape Borda Lighthouse, and promises an enchanting adventure in the northwestern expanse of the island.The trail unfolds along the ravine valley towards the coast, meandering past the creek bank and offering breathtaking vistas from elevated vantage points. It is a journey infused with historical intrigue, as in 1802 French explorer Nicolas Baudin encountered what he mistakenly identified as Cassowaries, but were actually Kangaroo Island Emus, sadly now extinct.Setting out with a group of four, we walked the mostly corrugated track from Cape Borda, greeted by the melodious calls of Currawongs on reaching the car park. Energised by the promise of discovery, we began the Ravine hike on a balmy summer morning.The path, clearly marked and moderately challenging, winds through rocky terrain, allowing us to marvel at the regenerative prowess of nature following the 2020 summer fires. The resilience of the landscape is evident as young gum trees flourish alongside their charred predecessors, a poignant testament to nature's ability to rebound.As we advanced glimpses of the valley below unfolded, which had previously been concealed before the ravages of the fire. Our journey was serenaded by unseen birds chirping, punctuated by the occasional appearance of charming superb blue fairy wrens and a rhythmic chorus of cicadas.Halfway into our hike, we encountered a shallow creek, its smooth rocks forming a picturesque border, where a solitary shag indulged in a leisurely swim. Amidst the eucalyptus forest, the subtle crackling of seed pods bursting open showcased nature's ingenious dispersal mechanisms.Gradually, the dense eucalyptus canopy yielded to coastal vegetation as we approached the shoreline. Sandy paths replaced rocky terrain, leading us to a spacious beach where the creek met the sea. Crossing the stream, we encountered soft, squeaky sand, flanked by towering cliff faces pocked with mysterious caves.The roar of the ocean served as our ultimate reward, accompanied by the spectacle of crashing waves. We spent an hour exploring the beach and its adjacent caves, discovering penguin footprints and marvelling at the raw beauty of the coastline.Our return journey, hastened by the rising temperature, offered a different perspective of the landscape. Pausing only to admire a monitor lizard seeking respite from the heat, we made our way back to the car, eager for the comfort of air conditioning.For future adventurers, we recommend allocating approximately three hours for the hike, allowing ample time to soak in the scenery and unwind at the beach.En route back to the road, a sign directs towards the Scott Cove lookout, offering a stunning panorama of the northern coastline and the Fides Bluff Marine Park, a reminder of the maritime history of Kangaroo Island. This is the final resting place of the ship ‘Fides’, which departed London on its final voyage from London on 11 January 1860 bound for Port Adelaide. In the early hours of May 22 heavy seas pounded the ship and within hours it had broken up. Five crew reached the shore and, after an arduous trek along the cliffs and through dense scrub, the survivors arrived at Cape Borda Lighthouse.Our final stop at Harvey's Return Cemetery paid homage to the pioneers of Cape Borda Lighthouse, set within the rugged landscape since 1858. As we bid farewell to this enchanting corner of Kangaroo Island, we carried with us memories of nature's resilience and the timeless allure of its coastal vistas.

Protecting the heritage of Milang
Protecting the heritage of Milang

15 June 2024, 4:04 AM

Alexandrina Council is asking the community for its views on a planning Code Amendment intended to protect the heritage of the former thriving river port town of Milang.The town has a small number of state heritage-listed buildings, but no Local Heritage buildings or places have ever been listed.In March this year, Planning Minister Nick Champion granted approval to the council to initiate a Code Amendment to address this lack.This followed comprehensive research that revealed many of the residential and civic buildings constructed between the 1850s and 1900 – when the River Murray was a major trade route - remain intact in Milang and invaluably contribute to the character of the town.The council’s Milang Local Heritage Code Amendment seeks to list several buildings, places and items, and establish a Historic Area Overlay to protect the substantial heritage in thelakeside town.Two local information sessions will offer the community the opportunity to ask questions of council staff about the Code Amendment. They will be held at the Milang Institute, on Coxe Street,  on Tuesday 18 June from 10am to 12noon and on Wednesday 3 July from 3pm to 5pm. Each session will start with a presentation.“Protecting and promoting Alexandrina’s history is a priority for our council, and Milang is one of our towns that has much of its early heritage still intact,” says Mayor Keith Parkes.“The early character of Milang is evident in its original subdivision pattern and surrounding parklands, and the historic buildings which remain from the 1850s to the early 1900s when Milang was a town for the district and a thriving port for the growing River Murray trade.“This main period of development in Milang has left a rich legacy of buildings, including prominent public buildings and churches and many private residences of varying degrees of scale and detail, which create the town’s heritage character."Milang was first surveyed in 1853 and in the ensuing decade, two hotels, a jetty, a steam mill, a store, a chapel and a post office and many homes were built.With the advent of the railway, and the difficulties of safely navigating the Murray Mouth, the height of the River Murray trade had passed by the 1920s.From the early days, the town has been involved in tourism, including cruising and regattas on the lake and River Murray, and the development of a caravan park and, inthe early 20th century, shacks on the foreshore.In 2023 Council became the first regional council in South Australia to endorse a full- scale Heritage Strategy and Action Plan.For further information about heritage in Alexandrina visit the council website.Community consultation on the Milang Local Heritage Code Amendment closes at 5pm on Friday 12 July.A report on the public feedback will then be presented to both Alexandrina Council and the state government.

Looking for a new family pet?
Looking for a new family pet?

14 June 2024, 9:30 PM

Meet the lovable Pets of the Week, looking for forever homes at the RSPCA South Australia’s animal care campus at O’Halloran Hill.Zeus and Eddie are this week’s friendly Pets of the Week. These loving animals are waiting to find their perfect family. If you think that could be you, read more about them below.Dog of the Week – ZeusThis beautiful boy is Zeus (AID 188842) and he’s currently living at RSPCA South Australia’ animal care campus at O’Halloran Hill while he waits to find his forever home.Just like the Greek God, Zeus is a handsome boy! Goofy, with a sweet and smoochy side. He was left behind by his previous owner and would love to find a caring family who can give him all the attention he deserves. You can't change his past, but you can rewrite his future.Zeus enjoys adventure, treats, playing with toys, and cuddling on the couch. A smart boy, he’d also love to take part in some force-free training classes.Although Zeus is not interested in sharing his home with a cat or small pet, he’d be open to living with another dog resident, but please bring your dog in to meet him first.  Read more about Zeus and learn how to adopt him.Handsome Zeus. Photo: RSPCA.Cat of the Week – EddieMeet Eddie (AID 187410) – this gorgeous boy has been in RSPCA South Australia’s care since he arrived in January as a stray. Beautiful on both the outside and in, Eddie dreams of finding a happy home to call his own. He’s a curious, kind and gentle soul. Eddie can be a little reserved around new people, but with some tasty treats he can easily be won over. He requires a loving and patient parent who understands that it can take time for animals to settle into a new environment. Once he comes out of his shell and builds a bond with you, he’ll be your best friend and loyal companion for life. Eddie would like to live in a quiet home without young children. He is open to living with another fur-resident, but as always, a slow introduction is important. You can visit Eddie at RSPCA’s Animal Care Campus at O’Halloran Hill. Find out more about Eddie and how to adopt him.Gorgeous Eddie. Photo: RSPCA.Visit the RSPCA RSPCA South Australia’s animal care campus at O’Halloran Hill and add a new companion to your life – you won’t regret it.The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) South Australia is the state’s oldest and largest animal welfare charity.

 Time to nominate the best in wine tourism
Time to nominate the best in wine tourism

14 June 2024, 2:30 AM

South Australia's wine tourism operators and wine producers have the chance to be showcased on the world stage as part of the 2025 Best Of Wine Tourism Awards.  Nominations are now open for the 2025 Great Wine Capitals’ Best of Wine Tourism Awards – a key annual awards program for the sector, which recognises the role wine tourism has in strengthening the regional economy through innovation, sustainability, and service excellence.  McLaren Vale wineries took out two of the seven award categories in last year’s award. Yangarra Estate was recognised in the Architecture & Landscape category and Gemtree Wines was honoured for its Sustainable Wine Tourism Practices.  McLaren Vale wineries have taken out accolades every year of the Awards across its 9-year history. The opportunity is made possible through South Australia’s membership of the Great Wine Capital Global Network (GWCGN), alongside other Great Wine Capitals around the world including Bordeaux and Napa Valley.  All 12 members of the GWCGN run parallel awards, with local category winners going on to compete in the Global Best Of Wine Tourism Awards which are judged by an international jury.  In 2024’s global awards held in Switzerland; Barossa Valley winery Alkina Wine Estate took home the Global Best Of Wine Tourism Award for Wine Tourism Accommodation.  Categories for the 2025 Best Of Wine Tourism Awards are: accommodation; architecture and landscape; art and culture; culinary experiences; innovative wine tourism experiences; wine tourism services; and sustainable wine tourism practices. With a continuing emphasis on sustainability, each of the shortlisted award entries for the first six award categories will be considered for the sustainable wine tourism practices award.  The Best Of Wine Tourism Awards are coordinated by the Great Wine Capital’s South Australian steering committee which includes representatives from the Department of Primary Industries and Regions (PIRSA), South Australian Tourism Commission, South Australian Wine Industry Association (SAWIA), and University of Adelaide.  For more information and to nominate for the 2025 Best Of Wine Tourism Awards go here. Award entry applications close on 12 July 2024. Gemtree - 2024 Sustainable Wine Tourism Practices (photo supplied)

Let the games begin at Goolwa
Let the games begin at Goolwa

13 June 2024, 8:33 PM

The official opening of the Goolwa Oval Recreation Precinct was held yesterday,  Thursday 13 June.Alexandrina Mayor Keith Parkes was joined by Senator for South Australia Karen Grogan and state Legislative Council MP Reggie Martin for the event.The federal government contributed $5 million towards this $8.2 million projectwith the state government providing an $800,000 Grassroots Grant.Alexandrina Council funded the remaining $2.4 million.Senator Grogan represented the federal Minister for Infrastructure and Mr Martin represented the South Australian Minister for Recreation, Sport and Racing.Others attending the opening ceremony at the new clubrooms included local federal MP for Mayo Rebekha Sharkie,  state MP for Finniss David Basham and representatives from affiliated football, cricket, hockey, netball, tennis, and croquet clubs and the Lions Club of Goolwa.“The Goolwa Oval Recreation Precinct project set out to create a modern, accessible, and adaptable sporting and community precinct in the heart of Goolwa,” says Mayor Keith Parkes.“Built over two stages, we now have facilities that meet modern standards for change rooms, toilets, playing surfaces, lighting, scoring and storage.“The upgrades also feature many sustainable features such as solar panels, rainwater storage and recycled materials. “We also installed much-needed stormwater infrastructure that collects the runoff from playing surfaces and pipes it to the wetlands near the oval to be recycled as irrigation water for the oval’s grassed areas.“As a council and a community, we look forward to the future growth and collaboration of the many clubs who call this precinct home.“Sport is an important part of community life in Alexandrina and our clubs are run by many hardworking volunteers.”As well as the new multisport facilities the precinct include a new, spacious, relocated Book Market Shed for the Lions Club of Goolwa with an accessible toilet, kitchen, office, and sorting area.It also features open green space, shelters, park furniture and a playground, as well as accessible public toilets open to the public and oval grounds seven days per week during daylight hours.

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