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One small update brought down millions of IT systems
One small update brought down millions of IT systems

22 July 2024, 3:03 AM

One small update brought down millions of IT systems around the world. It’s a timely warningThis weekend’s global IT outage caused by a software update gone wrong highlights the interconnected and often fragile nature of modern IT infrastructure. It demonstrates how a single point of failure can have far-reaching consequences.The outage was linked to a single update automatically rolled out to Crowdstrike Falcon, a ubiquitous cyber security tool used primarily by large organisations. This caused Microsoft Windows computers around the world to crash.CrowdStrike has since fixed the problem on their end. While many organisations have been able to resume work now, it will take some time for IT teams to fully repair all the affected systems – some of that work has to be done manually.How could this happen?Many organisations rely on the same cloud providers and cyber security solutions. The result is a form of digital monoculture.While this standardisation means computer systems can run efficiently and are widely compatible, it also means a problem can cascade across many industries and geographies. As we’ve now seen in the case of CrowdStrike, it can even cascade around the entire globe.Modern IT infrastructure is highly interconnected and interdependent. If one component fails, it can lead to a situation where the failed component triggers a chain reaction that impacts other parts of the system.As software and the networks they operate in becomes more complex, the potential for unforeseen interactions and bugs increases. A minor update can have unintended consequences and spread rapidly throughout the network.As we have now seen, entire systems can be brought to a grinding halt before the overseers can react to prevent it.How was Microsoft involved?When Windows computers everywhere started to crash with a “blue screen of death” message, early reports stated the IT outage was caused by Microsoft.In fact, Microsoft confirmed it experienced a cloud services outage in the Central United States region, which began around 6pm Eastern Time on Thursday, July 18 2024.This outage affected a subset of customers using various Azure services. Azure is Microsoft’s proprietary cloud services platform.The Azure outage had far-reaching consequences, disrupting services across multiple sectors, including airlines, retail, banking and media. Not only in the United States but also internationally in countries like Australia and New Zealand. It also impacted various Microsoft 365 services, including PowerBI, Microsoft Fabric and Teams.As it has now turned out, the entire Azure outage could also be traced back to the CrowdStrike update. In this case it was affecting Microsoft’s virtual machines running Windows with Falcon installed.What can we learn from this episode?Don’t put all your IT eggs in one basket.Companies should use a multi-cloud strategy: distributing their IT infrastructure across multiple cloud service providers. This way, if one provider goes down, the others can continue to support critical operations.Companies can also ensure their business continues to operate by building in redundancies into IT systems. If one component goes down, others can step up. This includes having backup servers, alternative data centres, and “failover” mechanisms that can quickly switch to backup systems in the event of an outage.Automating routine IT processes can reduce the risk of human error, which is a common cause of outages. Automated systems can also monitor for potential issues and address them before they lead to significant problems.Training staff on how to respond when outages occur can manage a difficult situation back to normal. This includes knowing who to contact, what steps to take, and how to use alternative workflows.How bad could an IT outage get?It’s highly unlikely the world’s entire internet could ever go down due to the distributed and decentralised nature of the internet’s infrastructure. It has multiple redundant paths and systems. If one part fails, traffic can be rerouted through other networks.However, the potential for even larger and more widespread disruptions than the CrowdStrike outage does exist.The catalogue of possible causes reads like the script of a disaster movie. Intense solar flares, similar to the Carrington Event of 1859 could cause widespread damage to satellites, power grids, and undersea cables that are the backbone of the internet. Such an event could lead to internet outages spanning continents and lasting for months.The global internet relies heavily on a network of undersea fibre optic cables. Simultaneous damage to multiple key cables – whether through natural disasters, seismic events, accidents, or deliberate sabotage – could cause major disruptions to international internet traffic.Sophisticated, coordinated cyber attacks targeting critical internet infrastructure, such as root DNS servers or major internet exchange points, could also cause large-scale outages.While a complete internet apocalypse is highly unlikely, the interconnected nature of our digital world means any large outage will have far-reaching impacts, because it disrupts the online services we’ve grown to depend upon.Continual adaptation and preparedness are vitally important to ensure the resilience of our global communications infrastructure.David TuffleySenior Lecturer in Applied Ethics & CyberSecurity, Griffith UniversityDavid Tuffley is a member of the Australian Computer Society (MACS).This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.

Full steam ahead for Oscar W
Full steam ahead for Oscar W

21 July 2024, 8:30 PM

In a milestone event for the heritage-listed PS Oscar W, Alexandrina Council has signed three leases with the Friends of the Oscar W to formally hand over the day-to-day operations of the historic paddle steamer.The Friends of the Oscar W is an incorporated body of multi-skilled volunteers who maintain, operate and crew this steam-powered, wood-fired paddle steamer.It was originally built for river trade in 1908 and is now a council-owned asset.The Friends have operated the paddle steamer and a portion of the historic Goolwa Wharf Shed as a riverboat tourism centre under a Joint Venture Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the council since 2010.On Thursday 18 July, the Friends and the council formalised a 10-year lease for the Lease, Operation and Maintenance Agreement of the PS Oscar W Vessel.They also signed a 10-year lease for the operation of the ‘Wood Yard’ at the Goolwa Community Precinct to manage the wood for the vessel and a five- year lease to operate the new ‘Goolwa Riverboat Centre’ being built in a portion of the Goolwa Wharf Shed currently under restoration.“This is a momentous milestone for the Friends and for Council,” says Mayor Keith Parkes.“We’ve been working with the Friends since 2023 to transition management from a Memorandum of Understanding arrangement with Council to a leasing arrangement.“Having leases in place provides greater security for all parties on the management of the PS Oscar W.“The Friends have greater clarity and autonomy in managing the Oscar W and their holistic business operations with more independence than is offered under an MOU and Council has more clarity regarding our financial involvement and risk management.“Council will be responsible for operating costs such as insurance and surveying as well as providing modest marketing and tourism support.“The Friends will be responsible for the daily operations of the Oscar W, mooring, managing the loading and unloading of wood and other items, repairs, tour bookings, recording keeping and volunteer management.“We look forward to working with the Friends to keep the history of the Oscar W and the riverport heritage of Goolwa and the Lower Lakes alive and well inour region.”Friends of the Oscar President George Kaiser says his committee has been involved with the operations of the 116-year-old paddle steamer for 35 years.“I’d like to take this opportunity to thank our many members, including some of our long-standing members Dave Finnie, Errol Thorp, Dennis Borchardt and of course our patron Roly Bartlett. “Without their involvement in the restoration of the Oscar W, we wouldn’t be where we are today.“We’re looking forward to working together and the future with the new Riverboat Centre. We thank Council for the contribution they have made to make it the best Riverboat Centre in South Australia.”At its July meeting Alexandrina Council also endorsed the Friends of Oscar W design for the fit-out of the historic Wharf Shed to create the Riverboat Centre and Workshop.This project will deliver a state-of-the-art audio-visual presentation, bringing Goolwa’s Riverport history to life. The council also endorsed the Friends of Oscar W’s business plan for 2024/25, illustrating a plan targeting increased revenue to become less reliant on council funding.

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KI celebrates Young Achievers on Settlement Day
KI celebrates Young Achievers on Settlement Day

20 July 2024, 10:48 PM

Kangaroo Island will celebrate its 188th Settlement Day on Friday 26 July with a ceremony at the Pioneers Memorial on Kingscote Esplanade.The event will also honour the 2024 Kangaroo Island Young Achievers of the Year, Ruby Lashmar and James Mitchell.Settlement Day on Kangaroo Island is a time-honoured tradition where outstanding young individuals are recognised for their accomplishments. The Young Achiever of the Year award acknowledges those who have shown exemplary leadership, dedication, and significant personal achievements or community involvement.KI Council says it selected Ruby Lashmar and James Mitchell for this year’s award after a rigorous evaluation process. Mayor Michael Pengilly has commended both recipients, highlighting their exceptional commitment to sports, community service, and academic pursuits."Ruby and James have consistently demonstrated outstanding achievements, including academic excellence at KICE, participation in leadership programs, and significant contributions to their community."Ruby is part of the Cruise Ship Volunteer Program, showcasing her local knowledge and dedication to South Australian tourism.James has achieved accolades at local, state, and national levels in sports, including KICE Athletics Champion in 2023 and 2024."Their accomplishments are a testament to their hard work and positive attitude," Mayor Pengilly says. "On behalf of Kangaroo Island Council and the community, I extend heartfelt congratulations to Ruby Lashmar and James Mitchell for their well-deserved recognition as the 2024 Kangaroo Island Young Achiever of the Year."The day will begin with a gathering at 10.15am for a 10.30 start to festivities.After the official ceremony the Hope Cottage Museum, affiliated with the National Trust of Australia, will host a Settlement Day morning tea at the Kingscote Council Chambers. 

From diamonds to drums: Bruce Rosewarne’s multifaceted life
From diamonds to drums: Bruce Rosewarne’s multifaceted life

20 July 2024, 8:00 PM

Bruce Rosewarne, a 77-year-old grandfather of 10, laughs at the mention of retirement. “Why would I want to?” asks the master jeweller, lacrosse legend and talented musician. It’s a good question. Bruce’s zest for life is palpable. Recently returned to Victor Harbor after two decades in Queensland, he says there is still strong demand for his brand of lovingly hand-crafted, custom-made jewellery. Plus, he says, “I just like doing things.” Mastering the craft of jewellery Bruce's professional journey began in 1963 with a six-year apprenticeship as a diamond ring maker and precious gemstone jeweller, complemented by a Diploma of Gemmology from Adelaide University in 1967. Since then, his dedication to his craft has led to numerous accolades during a stellar 60-year career. An award-winning designer, his work has been showcased internationally alongside renowned brands like Tiffany and Bulgari. Bruce is known for his meticulous attention to detail and his commitment to bespoke, handcrafted pieces. He says this approach stands in stark contrast to modern practices that often rely on computer-aided design and mass production. For him, the key is taking the time to talk to the clients and understand them. “I want to know what they want, not what I think they want,” he says. “The saddest thing in this industry is hearing about people having pieces made that they then go away and put in a drawer because they don't like them.” Always passionate about nurturing future talent, Bruce successfully lobbied the state government to establish a training school for South Australian jewellery apprentices to ensure they were taught the skills for creation rather than just repair. He also took on the role as the school’s off-site manager for 15 years during the 80s and 90s. Lacrosse legacy: beyond the field In parallel to his career as a jeweller, Bruce has had a significant impact on the lacrosse community as a player, coach, and administrator. His involvement with the sport began unexpectedly during high school when he was introduced to it by chance. “I was playing soccer at high school and then along comes a man with these wooden sticks.” This chance encounter ignited a lifelong passion, leading him to volunteer extensively in the sport across three states for over fifty years. Bruce’s dedication to lacrosse earned him an Australian Sports Medal in 2000, recognising his contribution to the sport. Rhythms of life: music as a lifelong obsession Music has also played a big role in Bruce’s life. He started his first band at 18 and became a top-notch percussionist and drummer, regularly gigging around Adelaide clubs with his band during the 60s, 70s and 80s. Since his move back to the Fleurieu he has rekindled his love of music by joining the Victor Harbor City Band and the Fleurieu Male Choir. Reflecting on his return to the south coast, Bruce is enthusiastic about the substantial development in the region, particularly the growth of the McLaren Vale vineyards and the new residential developments. "It’s good to see all the new people living down here now: it's not just the holiday destination for families from Adelaide anymore," he says. Bruce is certainly set to stay put on the Fleurieu. "This is home. The children and grandchildren are here. It’s not far from Adelaide, and we’re by the ocean."Surrounded by family, with the sea at his doorstep and music in his ears, Bruce continues to find joy in every aspect of his multifaceted life. The Pink Lady Jessica Watson, an exact replica size of the boat, which Bruce made & gifted to her for her achievement desire and attitude to prove that a young person could actually achieve sailing around the world solo.

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Meet the RSPCA Pets of the week: Teeka & Lily
Meet the RSPCA Pets of the week: Teeka & Lily

20 July 2024, 2:58 AM

This week, RSPCA South Australia shines a spotlight on two wonderful animals looking for their forever homes at the O’Halloran Hill animal care campus.Teeka: The Sweet and Snuggly GirlTeeka, with animal ID 189719, is a beautiful two-year-old dog who has been at the RSPCA South Australia’s animal care campus for over a month. Known for her sweet nature, Teeka is eager to find a loving home where she can build her confidence and enjoy cuddles with her new family.Teeka is open to living with another dog, but it’s important to bring your current pet to meet her first to ensure compatibility. The dedicated dog-care team at RSPCA will support every step of Teeka’s transition to help her settle smoothly into her new home. To learn more about Teeka or to meet her, visit her profile here.Lily: The Shy Bundle of JoyLovely Lily, with animal ID 189467, is one of the many cats currently residing at the O’Halloran Hill animal care campus. This three-year-old feline dreams of finding a loving home where she can feel safe and cherished.Lily has a shy side and enjoys hiding in dark places and wrapping herself up in blankets. Despite her reserved nature, she is a bundle of joy and would make a loyal and loving companion. Lily would be happy to share her home with another cat, but a slow introduction is crucial to ensure a smooth transition. To learn more about Lily or to meet her, visit her profile here.Both Teeka and Lily are eagerly waiting for families who will appreciate their unique personalities and offer them the love and care they deserve. If you’re interested in adopting, please visit the RSPCA South Australia’s animal care campus at O’Halloran Hill.Visit the RSPCA South Australia’s animal care campus at O’Halloran Hill and add a new companion to your life – it's a decision you won’t regret.The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) South Australia is the state’s oldest and largest animal welfare charity, dedicated to giving animals a second chance at a happy life.

Milang library depot moves to community centre
Milang library depot moves to community centre

19 July 2024, 10:29 PM

Alexandrina Council’s library depot in Milang will move to the Milang Old School House Community Centre (MOSHCC) over the next few months.The relocation means residents can drop-off library items and pick-up on-hold resources during MOSHCC opening hours, Monday to Friday.The council’s library depot has been operating part-time out of a small room attached to the Milang Institute on Coxe Street since 1997.It is currently open 4.5 hours a week on Monday afternoons, 3pm to 5pm, and Friday mornings 9.30 am to 12noon.The move has been prompted by recent concerns about the suitability of library facilities at the Institute. The attached room only has one door and can only be accessed externally, so it does not meet modern Work, Health and Safety (WHS) regulations on emergency exits.CEO Nigel Morris says the library depot in Milang is a much loved service in the town with around 720 visitors last financial year.“Nearly three quarters of the visits are to collect items booked online. “Council wants to maintain this important service for the community, but we do need to address WHS issues, and we are also aware of ongoing internet connection problems in the facility.“We have been talking to the Milang and Districts Community Association (MADCA) about using some space at their MOSHCC for a pick-up and drop-off point for library resources.“MADCA has been incredibly supportive of this option and so Council is now in the process of making the transition to a new location. We hope to be completely moved by Monday 30 September.“Our library team is excited about the new opportunities presented by being in the MOSHCC and are hoping to promote all the services that can be accessed via the library service, with the aim of increasing usage and membership.“The library service at MOSHCC will provide a more flexible and user-friendly experience because it is open daily.“The library team will be assisting to ensure the digital on-line library experience is optimised for the community.“They are looking to host drop in sessions at MOSHCC to provide one-on-one digital assistance.“Council is continuing to provide a financial contribution to the MOSHCC and Council’s Community Development team has been assisting with providing activities at the Milang Youth Hub.”Alexandrina Library officer Sally Primiero is preparing for the move.

The most South Aussie story ever told
The most South Aussie story ever told

19 July 2024, 2:48 AM

Victor Harbor’s Victa Cinema is set to host a one-night-only screening of Pete Williams' feature film, Emotion is Dead, on Wednesday 24 July, at 7pm. The event will feature a live introduction by the writer/director, followed by an engaging Q&A session.Emotion is Dead has been acclaimed as, "the most South Aussie story ever told." This gripping story revolves around the closure of the Holden Elizabeth Plant, Australia's last auto factory. The film follows the journey of Brock (Jude Turner), a teenage skateboarder who devises a unique money-making scheme in the wake of a personal tragedy linked to the plant’s closure. Brock's desperate venture involves petty crimes, and only his Peter-Brock-obsessed mother, Shazza (Gabby Llewelyn), and his emo ex-girlfriend, Kylie (Tatiana Goode), stand between him and a harrowing fate.Emotion is Dead delves into themes of a mother’s unconditional love, the chasm between wealth and morality, and the precarious employment landscape for youth amidst de-industrialisation.Following a successful debut at the Adelaide Film Festival, Pete Williams is excited to bring his film to cinemas across Australia, starting with special event screenings in Adelaide and regional South Australia."I wanted Emotion is Dead to be a love letter to Adelaide and its northern suburbs. The closure of the Elizabeth Holden Factory felt like a death in the family and became the catalyst for my screenplay," Pete says. "The story evolved to incorporate my own experiences, where skateboarding, punk rock, and petty crimes were integral parts of our lives."Williams drew inspiration from his meetings with friends, family, Holden retirees, and academics affected by the factory’s closure, amalgamating their stories into a single protagonist that captures the pain, helplessness, and confusion of the Elizabeth community.Emerging filmmakers from South Australia’s leading film schools contributed to the production, which spanned over two years and involved more than 100 local crew members and actors. Iconic South Australian locations, such as the Big Rocking Horse at Gumeracha and the old Holden Elizabeth Plant, add authenticity to the film.The Emotion is Dead Aussie Indie Cinema Tour will showcase the film in over 30 cinemas across Australia from July to October, with 15 special event screenings in metro Adelaide and regional South Australia, each featuring a post-screening cast and crew Q&A.

Weather Warnings for the Fleurieu & KI
Weather Warnings for the Fleurieu & KI

18 July 2024, 6:04 AM

Sheep Graziers AlertAttention all sheep graziers in the region! The Bureau of Meteorology has issued a warning for Friday, indicating that cold temperatures, showers, and strong northwesterly winds are expected. This weather is likely to affect the Mount Lofty Ranges, Lower Eyre Peninsula, Yorke Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, Mid North, Upper South East, and Lower South East forecast districts. Parts of the Eastern Eyre Peninsula, Flinders, and Murraylands forecast districts may also experience these harsh conditions.For our community on the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island, this means a heightened risk of losses for lambs and sheep exposed to the elements. Please take necessary precautions to protect your livestock from the severe weather expected.Severe Weather Warning for Damaging WindsIssued at 10:34 am on Thursday, 18 July 2024, the Bureau of Meteorology has also released a Severe Weather Warning for damaging winds. This affects people in the Mount Lofty Ranges, Kangaroo Island, and parts of the West Coast, Lower Eyre Peninsula, Yorke Peninsula, and Murraylands districts.Weather Situation: Strengthening northwesterly winds ahead of an approaching cold front are anticipated to bring damaging wind gusts starting Friday morning. Following the cold front, a vigorous southwesterly flow will impact parts of the coastal fringe, continuing through to Saturday morning.Mount Lofty Ranges: Expect strong winds averaging 50 to 60 km/h, with damaging gusts around 90 km/h from early Friday morning.Coastline: Damaging winds averaging 60 to 70 km/h, with gusts around 100 km/h, are possible from Friday afternoon. These conditions will begin on the coastal fringe of the West Coast, extending eastward throughout the day and into the southeast by Saturday morning. Locations that may be affected include Port Lincoln, Ceduna, Kingscote, Elliston, Fowlers Bay, Streaky Bay, and Warooka.Safety Advice:Move vehicles under cover or away from trees.Secure or put away loose items around your property.Stay indoors and away from windows while conditions are severe.Please stay safe and take all necessary precautions as these weather events unfold. Stay tuned to the Fleurieu App for further updates and information.South Australian Weather Warnings Information

Wake-up call to drowsy drivers
Wake-up call to drowsy drivers

18 July 2024, 3:24 AM

South Australia Police (SAPOL) has produced a new advertisement targeting tired drivers to demonstrate the impact of fatigue on road safety.Fatigue is a major contributor to road crashes. Unlike professional drivers of the trucking industry, fatigue involving drivers of private passenger vehicles cannot be measured or policed. The community is relying on individual driver awareness and responsibility to manage their own fatigue.South Australia has extensive rural regions with long stretches of road that could result in long and uninterrupted trips often with monotonous conditions that can easily trigger tiredness.By the time you finish reading this sentence, a driver could have drifted and hit another car on the opposite side of the road. “If you have ever felt drowsiness, yawning, trouble keeping your head up, or even daydreaming behind the wheel… it could have been you,” warned Superintendent Darren Fielke, Officer in Charge of Traffic Services Branch. “We want people to recognise those signs before they literally drift off, which is what we depict with this campaign.”"SAPOL carefully selected a setting that realistically represents a South Australian country road where most fatigue-related crashes occur," Superintendent Fielke explained.The first scenes of the campaign were filmed on Friday 21 June 2024 in the town of Monarto. Filming started at dawn with preparations and rehearsals. The production team was in a 4WD vehicle equipped with powerful lights and a camera to closely capture the car's movements performing a run-off road manoeuvre and a near-miss with an oncoming car. To simulate a real-life situation as closely as possible, the crew filmed on a closed road with a stunt driver and full complement of safety officers carefully staging and managing the mock incident.Additional scenes were shot in an Adelaide studio, against a green screen with actors playing drivers who ‘were drifting off’. An attention-getting visual will be created by editing the footage with near misses to show what could happen in a fatigue crash.A recent study by the University of Adelaide’s Centre for Automotive Safety Research conservatively estimates that fatigue contributes to 11.5% of fatal crashes and 4.3% casualty crashes.“Fatigue is a silent killer on our roads. It is particularly dangerous because fatigued drivers often have decreased ability to judge their own level of tiredness. It is crucial drivers identify early signs before they literally drift off”, Superintendent Fielke says.The campaign will appear later in 2024 coinciding with long weekends and holiday periods.To prevent fatigue, South Australia Police recommends:Get enough quality sleep before you begin driving. Be sure to have 7 to 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep before your trip.Travel no more than 8 to 10 hours each day.Take regular 15 minutes breaks at least every two hours. Get out of the car, get some fresh air and some exercise.If possible, share the driving. Get your passengers to tell you if you look tired or if you are showing signs of tiredness.Avoid fatty foods which can make you feel drowsy. Eat well balanced meals at your usual mealtimes.Avoid starting trips after work. You will be tired already even though you do not realise it.Avoid driving during typical sleep hours (1am-6am). The chances of crashing are much higher late at night and early morning.Avoid alcohol and medicines that can cause drowsiness.

South coast councils grants programs open
South coast councils grants programs open

17 July 2024, 9:00 PM

Alexandrina Council and the City of Victor Harbor have opened their annual community grants programs for applications.Local environmental groups, sporting clubs, community organisations, and heritage projects are invited to apply for a share of $125,000 in grants now available through Alexandrina Council.There are four different funding streams for eligible applicants:Community Environment Grant (funding pool $20,000 with grants of up to $4,000 available).Community Events Grant (funding pool of $20,000 with grants of up to $2,500 available)Community Wellbeing Grant (funding pool of $65,000 over four different streams with grants of up to $5,000 available).Heritage Grant (funding pool of $20,000 with grants of up to $2,500 available).Potential applicants have six weeks to work on their project ideas with applications closing on 26 August. For more information go to the Alexandrina Council website. City of Victor Harbor community grants are available to groups or individuals in three areas:Support for professional development in areas such as sports, the arts, academia or community participation and leadership.Assistance for new and ongoing project delivery for community groups and not-for-profit organisations.Support for the recognition and celebration of volunteers. Applications are open until 6 August; application forms, eligibility and selection criteria can be found on the council website. Alexandrina Mayor Keith Parkes says there are so many clubs, groups and organisations delivering innovative programs and much-needed projects in the local community.“Council wants to support them in their efforts to make our region more liveable, green and connected,” he says.“Our grants also help our endeavours to meet the actions in our Heritage Strategy and Action Plan, our Environmental Action Plan, and our Community Wellbeing Action Plan.“Last year our environment, community wellbeing and business initiative grants alone assisted 26 local businesses, clubs and organisations with a range of initiatives including ‘come and try’ lawn bowls, public art mural projects, biodiversity initiatives, heritage building restoration and a community resilience building presentation.“This year we’ve streamlined our Grants Program, offering four categories in July and then three other categories later this year or early 2025.“Each of the grant categories offered aims to both support the community with their project ideas and assist in achieving Council’s strategic objectives.“Within the Community Wellbeing Grant, four different funding streams are offered to provide financial assistance with a range of community projects including Active and Healthy; Connected and Inclusive; Vibrant and Artistic; Places and Spaces.“This will enable us to support a wide variety of community endeavours including sport, the arts, community facilities, health, and wellbeing.“We will be offering a Small Grants Program from October onwards to provide financial support to individuals and community groups for a wide range of project types and endeavours up to the value of $1,000.“Then in early 2025, applications will open for the Business Initiative Grants program and our new Community Choice Grants, which will see community groups pitch their project ideas to their peers.“I encourage all our community groups and organisations to investigate our 2024-25 Grant Program.

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